ABOUT US

WHO WE ARE

We are a small team made up of 4 active Youth Project Workers, Our Director, Our Comms Person, our board members and our wonderful volunteers.

Each member of our team has lived experience of mental health challenges and working towards individual recovery. 

Coming from various backgrounds, each person brings a wealth of personality and professionalism to the team!

WHAT WE DO

We offer low intensity intervention to those suffering with low level (mild to moderate) mental health issues and/or those at risk of developing them. 

One Step Borders is a Community Interest Company set up in June 2015, supporting young people (aged 16-25) in the Scottish Borders experiencing emotional and/or mental health challenges.

OUR STORY 

One Step Borders was set up in 2015 by Alex, who was working in primary schools based in the Selkirk areas. He focussed mainly on transition work with students who were moving up to high school Receiving positive feedback for his work, he continued this support work for free. Later that year, he secured funding that allowed him to pilot his peer support programme for 16-25 year olds in the Scottish Borders. Over the space of six months, Alex worked with 65 Young People and had accumulated a waiting list. And that, is how One Step Borders was born! 

You can find more information about how we came to be and our continued progress on our One Step Timeline. 

OUR MISSION

One Step Borders' is to ensure that Young People in the Scottish Borders have access to adequate and quality support with their mental health and emotional wellbeing. 

We offer a range of compassion focussed services that we adapt to the needs of the individual. 

OUR INFLUENCE

Since our inception, we have become a well established and respected support service. We work alongside other organisations in the Scottish Borders to maximise the opportunities available to our Young People. 

Service users have told us how receiving support from One Step Borders has helped because they're made to feel like a person rather than a patient.